Donald Trump Sues Facebook, Twitter And Google For Censorship

First modification: 07/07/2021 – 22:08 Last modification: 07/07/2021 – 22:07

The former US president announced this Wednesday, July 7, that he will file a collective lawsuit against Facebook, Twitter and Google, intensifying his battle for freedom of expression on the networks, after the censorship of which he claims to be a victim.

Washington (AFP)

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“I am filing, as lead representative, a class action lawsuit against Big Tech, including Facebook, Google and Twitter, as well as their CEOs, Mark Zuckerberg, Sundar Pichai and Jack Dorsey,” Trump announced at his golf club in Bedminster, New York. Sweater.

The three groups “implement an illegal and unconstitutional censorship,” added the 75-year-old Republican leader who was suspended on Facebook and Twitter after his supporters’ deadly assault on Capitol Hill on January 6.

“We are asking the Federal Court for the Southern District of Florida to order an immediate end to the illegal and shameful censorship by social media groups targeting Americans,” he said. “We demand (…) the end of forced silence,” he claimed.

“We stand for American democracy by upholding the free speech rights of every American – Democrat, Republican, Independent, whatever,” Trump said. “This lawsuit is just the beginning,” he added.

Trump, who claims to be accompanied in the lawsuit by thousands of citizens who have been excluded from social networks, assured that he seeks an immediate end to censorship, blacklists and what he calls the “cancellation” of people who share his political positions.

He remarked that he does not seek any type of agreement with his defendants. “We are in a fight that we are going to win,” he said. Viewers applauded his announcement.

The lawsuit comes as Congress took unprecedented action to mitigate the power of big tech corporations.

At the end of June, the House of Representatives advanced on an antitrust reform aimed at curbing business practices by Google, Apple, Amazon and Facebook that it considers harmful to the market and consumers.

“Out of control”

“There is no better proof that ‘big tech’ is out of control than the fact that they banned the sitting president of the United States” from speaking on their platforms, Trump said in his speech.

“If they can do it to me, they can do it to anyone. And also, that’s exactly what they do,” he justified.

In June, Facebook announced its decision to suspend Trump’s accounts for two years.

Trump’s Facebook & Instagram accounts will be suspended until at least Jan. 7, 2023.

FB says it will only reinstate him “if the risk to public safety has receded” https://t.co/7qvKq2trQY

– Vera Bergengruen (@VeraMBergen) June 4, 2021

He had already been temporarily excluded on January 7, when he was still president, for having urged his followers to prevent Congress from confirming the victory of Democrat Joe Biden in the November elections. Without presenting evidence, Trump has said he lost that election fraudulently.

The social network Twitter had also suspended it after the invasion of the legislative headquarters in the middle of the certification session of Biden’s victory, that January 6.

Before being suspended, Trump had nearly 89 million followers on Twitter, 35 million on Facebook and 24 million on Instagram.

“Google and YouTube have removed countless videos that dared to question the criteria of the World Health Organization” (WHO) during the coronavirus pandemic, he also said on Wednesday.

Few chances

Some legal experts believe that Trump has little chance of winning.

The First Amendment to the Constitution, which establishes freedom of expression, “only binds government actors, not private entities,” Eric Goldman, an academic at Santa Clara University, told AFP. He added that dozens of lawsuits similar to Trump’s failed.

In the action against Facebook, Trump alleges that the cooperation of large technology companies with the federal government modified their status as private companies and turned them into state actors.

“As such, the defendant is limited by the First Amendment right to free speech in the censorship decisions he makes with his users,” the lawsuit says.

CCIA President Matt Schruers called Trump’s lawsuit “frivolous” and added that “it will not change the fact that users, including US presidents, must abide by the rules they agreed to.”



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