Runners Outside The Three-foot Line Are Out

Runners Outside The Three-foot Line Are Out

For the promotion of baseball and softball runners, there is a specific fictitious area within the infield that is 3 feet. Runners never leave that space to avoid being out when a fielder attempts to tag them.

When it comes to avoiding collision with a fielder in the act of searching for the ball, the rules allow it.

Example-1: Runner A moves from 1st to 2nd base, the 2nd baseman catches the ball at 2nd base, attempts to tag, but leaves the imaginary 3-foot area to avoid the ball. The referee’s decision is a valid appreciation play, marking the play and declaring the offender out.

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Its outs and all automatics are credited to the fielder closest to or running it.

Example-2: If a fielder is in the runner’s seat and is attempting to play or catch a ball, the runner may leave the three-foot line to avoid collision.

If a fielder is not acting to play, the fielder must clear the area to allow the runners to pass. If not, the umpire will call an obstruction. This constitutes a foul committed by him: the ball remains dead and all runners advance at the umpire’s discretion without danger of being put out on the bases they would have reached but for the obstruction. A runner who is obstructed shall be awarded at least one base beyond the last base legally touched before he was obstructed. Dear Lead Runners,

It is good to specify that if a runner leaves the three-foot line, it is out only if the play is intended. , it is very common to leave that imaginary line in order to better reach second base.

The same thing happens if he’s trying to reach home plate in second place.

Baseball’s 7:00 rule and all its sections speak for runners.

Long experience as statistics manager for the Los Angeles Dodgers in the Dominican Republic and correspondent for Media El Caribe, El Nacional and La Noticia. He was the editor of Ultima Hora and was responsible for Winter Ball statistics for Listin Diario.

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