The Political Trial Of Donald Trump Enters The Decisive Stage – 12/17/2019

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The Democratic Party battles for the inclusion of certain witnesses and the development of a fair trial of Donald Trump in the Senate, days before a historic vote in the House of Representatives to accuse the president for abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.

Chief Democratic Senator Chuck Schumer said he aims to begin on January 6 a process that will impart “quick but fair justice” to Trump, even as loyal Republicans acknowledge being more interested in protecting the president than in being part of a impartial jury when the case reaches the Senate.

Congressmen begin a momentous week. The chairman of the Judicial Committee of the House of Representatives, Jerry Nadler, published on Monday a 658-page report describing the case to accuse Trump and details the alleged irregularities he incurred, such as pressuring Ukraine to investigate Democrats.

It details severe episodes of “criminal” behavior by the president, including bribery, refuting the Republican argument that the Democrats have not identified any specific criminal offenses committed by Trump.

"President Trump's abuse of power encompassed both the constitutional crime of 'bribery' and multiple federal crimes," says the text.

The House of Representatives Rules Committee will meet on Tuesday to establish guidelines for a debate on the political trial.

President Donald Trump Photo: Reuters

Because when the lower house controlled by the Democrats meets tomorrow Wednesday to weigh the two charges approved by the Judiciary Committee, Trump is expected to become the third American president to be charged, after Andrew Johnson in 1868 and Bill Clinton in 1998 .

Richard Nixon resigned in 1974 just before a vote of dismissal from the House. Both Johnson and Clinton were acquitted in the Senate.

Trump is unlikely to be removed from office by the Senate, where Republicans enjoy a majority of 53 to 47.

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