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Categories: US News

The United States Exceeds 127,300 Deaths And 2.62 Million Coronavirus Infections

Washington – The United States reached 2,629,372 confirmed cases of COVID-19 and 127,322 deaths on Tuesday, according to an independent count by Johns Hopkins University.

This balance is 42,528 more infections than on Monday and 1,199 new deaths, of which more than 600 correspond to old deaths in New York City added to the system today.

The average of new daily cases in the United States is since last week above 40,000 dragged by the rebound in southern and western states such as Florida, Texas, California and Arizona.

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New York, however, still remains the state hardest hit in the United States by the pandemic with 393,454 confirmed cases and 32,032 deaths, a figure just below Brazil, the United Kingdom and Italy.

In New York City alone, 23,096 people have died.

New York is followed by neighboring New Jersey with 15,035 deaths, Massachusetts with 8,053 and Illinois with 6,923.

Other states with a large number of deaths are Pennsylvania with 6,649, Michigan with 6,193, California with 6,013 or Connecticut with 4,322.

In terms of infections, California is the second state only behind New York with 226,851.

The provisional balance of deaths – 127,322 – has already exceeded the lowest level of the initial estimates of the White House, which projected at best between 100,000 and 240,000 deaths from the pandemic.

US President Donald Trump lowered those estimates and was confident that the final figure would rather be between 50,000 and 60,000 deaths, although in his latest calculations he already predicted up to 110,000 deaths, a number that has also been exceeded.

For its part, the Institute of Health Metrics and Assessments (IHME) of the University of Washington, in whose models of prediction of the evolution of the pandemic the White House often sets, calculates that the United States will arrive in October with about 175,000 dead.

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