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Will Boosters Be Needed For The COVID-19 Vaccine, And When? | Health | Magazine

Six months is the time frame for which there is secure information.

On April 1, Pfizer announced that its COVID-19 vaccine offers up to six months of strong protection against the symptomatic form of the disease.

Data from phase 3 of their study showed that the vaccine was 91.3% effective in preventing COVID-19 for up to six months after the second dose and 100% effective against severe disease.

But that doesn’t mean the vaccine is only good for six months. It’s possible that Pfizer’s and the others provide immunity for more than that, says infectious disease expert Amesh A. Adalja, a senior researcher in Health Security at the Johns Hopkins Center. He bases his prediction on what is known about the flu vaccine, which is useful for at least a year.

What will happen when the effect of the vaccine wears off? It’s not entirely clear now, but William Schaffner, a professor at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, says it won’t be an erratic process, but rather gradual wear and tear. Since everyone’s immune system is different, there may be different times for each individual.

The good news, according to doctors, remains that if those vaccinated contract COVID-19, the symptoms will be less severe.

Will booster doses of the COVID-19 vaccine be necessary?

Both Pfizer and Moderna are studying whether boosters for the vaccine would be helpful in maintaining initial dose protection, especially when faced with newly emerging variants.

In March, the Israeli president, Benjamin Netanyahu, declared that he was in the mood for a reinforcement for the population, and when it should be put … although they are inclined to think that the answer is yes, given that a percentage of fully vaccinated individuals have tested positive for infection.model.

However, scientists like Adalja believe that it is too early to know whether or not boosters are necessary, and when they should be applied … although they are inclined to think that the answer is yes, given that a percentage of fully vaccinated individuals have given positive for infection.

“Vaccines are great but not perfect,” says Schaffner. “The virus will be with us for a long time, like influenza, and there will be variants and mutations that will require a targeted boost.”

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